What If my Landlord enters without giving me notice

When can the Landlord enter my Place?

The Issue

What if the landlord wants to enter my place?

What rights do I have? Can the landlord just walk in when the landlord feels like it?


The Law

There are rules when renting a place to live in Queensland whether it’s a house, unit, share house room, caravan or houseboat that protects you as a tenant.

These rules are set out in the Residential Tenancies and Rooming Accommodation Act 2008.

These rules are administered by the Residential Tenancies Authority (RTA) which is a government body responsible for the fair operation of these Rules.

Your landlord does have the right to enter your place but only as allowed in the Rules, including for completing a General Inspection.


The Solution

The landlord can only come into your place only if you have been given prior written notice.

Prior written notice is most commonly issued by a form called an Entry Notice (Form 9).

You must be given a minimum of 7 days prior written notice of entry for a General Inspection and a minimum 24 hours prior written notice of entry for maintenance repairs to your place.

Your landlord cannot enter your place on a Sunday, public holiday, or between 6pm and 8am, unless you have agreed.

Your landlord can enter your place at all other times as long as you have been given the required prior written notice within the stipulated timeframe.

The Residential Tenancies Authority can provide you with general information as well as answer specific questions about your rental rights and responsibilities.  The RTA Client Contact Centre can be contacted at the cost of a local phone call on 1300 366 311. Alternatively you can refer to the RTA website at www.rta.qld.gov.au/renting.

If after contacting the RTA you still require legal advice, please contact Qld Law Group for assistance on 1300 Qld Law.


Yellow Rhino - Diamond 65The Rhino Rule

What if the landlord knocks on my door and wants to come in to my place without telling me first?

The Rhino Rule is be polite and ask if there is a reason and if there is a good one, the place is clean and tidy and you have time let the landlord in but don’t let this become a common thing.

What If I Rent a Place to Live Series – Rental Bond

What Bond should I Pay?

The Issue

What amount should I pay as a rental bond if I rent a new place to live?

Can the landlord demand I pay any amount?


The Law

There are rules when renting a place to live in Queensland whether it’s a house, unit, share house room, caravan or houseboat that protects you as a tenant.

These rules are set out in the Residential Tenancies and Rooming Accommodation Act 2008.

The Residential Tenancies Authority (RTA) is a government body which is responsible for the fair operation of these rules.

Most tenants will be required to pay rental bond at the start of a rental agreement into the landlord’s agent trust account (this means it can’t be spent by the landlord).

The rental bond is used as financial protection for the landlord in case of a breach of the terms of the rental agreement.  If no terms of the rental agreement are breached, then on completion of the rental agreement, you are entitled to have the full bond returned.

If the rent is $700 or less per week, your maximum bond amount will be four weeks rent. If your weekly rent is higher than $700, the amount of your bond should be negotiated between you and your landlord.

The four week amount would be a good starting point.


The Solution

Make sure that you receive a receipt from either the landlord or his agent in writing for the amount of the bond.

The Residential Tenancies Authority (RTA) can provide you with general information as well as answer specific questions about your rental rights and responsibilities. The RTA Client Contact Centre can be contacted for the cost of a local phone call on 1300 366 311. Alternatively you can refer to the RTA website at www.rta.qld.gov.au/renting.

If after contacting the RTA you still require legal advice, please contact Qld Law Group for assistance on 1300 Qld Law.


Yellow Rhino - Diamond 65The Rhino Rule

What if I want to share a place with someone who is already a tenant and they ask me to pay part of the bond to them?

The Rhino Rule is always get your name onto the rental agreement and the bond is paid to the landlord and not your house mate otherwise it may hard to get your bond back when you leave.

What If I Rent a Place to Live Series – Rental Agreement

What Should I Sign?

The Issue

What if I have found a new place to live?

What documents should I sign before I move in?


The Law

There are rules when renting a place to live in Queensland whether it’s a house, unit, share house room, caravan or houseboat that protects you as a tenant.

These rules are set out in the Residential Tenancies and Rooming Accommodation Act 2008.

The Residential Tenancies Authority (RTA) is a government body which is responsible for the fair operation of these rules.

Under these rules all rental agreements must be in writing. Your landlord and you must both sign one of these documents:

  1. General Tenancy Agreement Form 18a (used for houses, flats and units). This is the most common type of rental agreement.
  2. Movable Dwelling Tenancy Agreement (used for caravans and movable dwellings).
  3. Rooming Accommodation Agreement (used for rooming accommodation such as a boarding house).

The Solution

Make sure that you receive a written rental agreement before you move in to your new place.

Before signing the rental agreement, check that the details are correct, specifically in regard to the term of the rental agreement, the amount of rent being paid, what additional charges (if any, e.g. electricity and water) are to be paid and by whom. Do an inspection of the place and photo any damage and make sure you sign an Inspection Report.

Make sure that the landlord gives you signed copies of the rental agreement and Inspection Report and a receipt for the bond.

The Residential Tenancies Authority (RTA) can provide you with general information as well as answer specific questions about your rental rights and responsibilities. The RTA Client Contact Centre can be contacted at the cost of a local phone call on 1300 366 311. Alternatively you can refer to the RTA website at www.rta.qld.gov.au/renting.

If after contacting the RTA you still require legal advice, please contact Qld Law Group for assistance on 1300 Qld Law.


Yellow Rhino - Diamond 65The Rhino Rule

What if I am worried about losing documents?

The Rhino Rule is set up a folder on your PC for the new place and scan and save any documents you get for the place or take and keep photos on your phone.